Watch Films > Archive > 2011

Egg & Fag

by Rose Hendry

   

24 Comments for “Egg & Fag”

  • Steven Wells says:

    Ifeel insulted that this got selected and Ididn’t。 

    You can call me jealous, but I feel this video is more being artsy then actually being good.

  • Wibbles says:

    I agree. Unfortunately, that is what you get with the Depict competition. It now seems to be a byword for the odd and the fateous. Odd I like, but devoid of creativity and real ideas, not keen.

  • Richard says:

    The more I watch this, the more layers I see. It has excellent lighting, sound design, make up, set design, and camera work. There’s even a hint of an intelligent message about feminism in there.

  • AndiB says:

    Well crafted load of garbage. If you have nothing to say, then it is better to say nothing.

  • Jenny Shepherd says:

    I liked it a lot but thought the ending needed to be stronger/ more surprising. There was a sense of suspense as you revealed the details of the frozen domestic prison the smoker’s stuck inside – but I wanted more than mild egg abuse at the end. At least cracking a raw egg over the camera lens or something. Beautifully shot and lit and sound recorded.

  • Sarah Curtis says:

    Loved the colour , sound, lighting, and for a short film I really like it. It is esthetically pleasing and of a high quality. The simple acting, action gives room for the delightful colours etc to come through.

  • Josh Randall says:

    Style and no content Unless -!
    Unless the fact that the room has symmetrical stuff scattered along each surface and the egg represent some sort of embryonic development being stubbed out onto causally represents the day to day attitude of abortions?
    – but I doubt it
    All the gear and no idea…

  • Thomas Waddington says:

    I think this short is brilliant. It does exactly what a short film should do- pose more questions than it answers. Who says that a film has to have a ‘point’ or a traditional narrative. It is so sad to see disgruntled filmmakers making negative comments about another person’s work, especially when said work actually deserves to be praised.

  • Eden J. H. Sleepwell says:

    What sadly resentful comments I’m reading! I thought that for a vignette of only a minute and a half it was exquisite and bold – really wonderfully composed and coloured. Whatever the whinging “film-makers” above contest they could have done in a similar time-frame – condense some sort of narrative into the space of half a cigarette? what is it you’re claiming? – all that anyone could hope to do in this space is deal with the tacit and the implied, and this film did that perfectly, a very provocative mosaic of domesticity. I wouldn’t be at all upset if this won.

  • Roy Walker says:

    Steven Wells, could the issue be that your lego film was a jug of piss?

  • BettyBoop says:

    This film looks beautiful, it is well lit and framed. However it is the most pointless film I think I have ever seen. In fact I wouldn’t even class this as a film, more like a pretentious piece of self indulgent rubbish. All this ‘film’ does is show that you have an eye for beauty but not for writing. No story, no plot, big NO for me.

  • Hans Krebb says:

    Couldn’t agree more with Thomas Waddington. Sounds like, for a lot of these comments, the critique is merely a case of sour grapes…

    Art doesn’t have to have some intrinsic meaning, but it has to provoke a feeling within its audience. Whether that feeling is positive or negative towards the art usually says more about the interpreter rather than the artist. Why not just appreciate something for its aesthetic beauty, rather than dissecting it to find a meaning in order to satisfy our notions of what art *should* be?

    This short is breath-taking — in terms of both beauty and narrative — perhaps that’s why it was short-listed over a stop-motion Lego animation that is a carbon copy of the work of a thousand YouTube “directors”.

  • Alex Tobin says:

    These comments! People are still offended by non-narrative art? Maybe I’m optimistic, but I thought we were past that a long time ago (like Duchamp-long-ago).
    It’s almost embarassing to have to put this so bluntly, but: BettyBoop, Josh Randall, AndiB – how do you cope with non-figurative painting? What about poetry that doesn’t rhyme? How about that crazy new “hip-hop” fad where they talk over the music?
    Rose, I’ve already said this to you, but your work is fantastic. Good luck with this.

  • Robert says:

    There’s a good quote that applies to the people commenting about a lack of plot: “It is better to say nothing and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.”

  • Janice Peggie says:

    In response to Steven Wells’ comments, the reason this film is selected is because it is a wonderful example a what a short film should be, it ticks all boxes and is extremely pleasing to the eye.The reason yours has not been selected is because it is clearly none of the above, Pretty simple really !!!

  • Emily Milne says:

    Hans Krebb- you took the words out my mouth.

    Steven Wells- maybe this should be a reality check for you.

    Wibbles – ‘… but devoid of creativity and real ideas, not keen.’ haha, of coarse, i mean whats creative about this film? apart from the whole film????

    Just because there is no clear, spoon fed message, it suddenly diminishes the sheer talent and artists ideas present in this film. i think not.

  • Roger Ebert says:

    Steven Wells, it is an honour to be in the same comments section as you. You are an auteur. I am blinded by your craft. I see you were making an ironic point about the banality of lego animations; genius.

    Haters gon’ hate, this film is fantastic and deserves to be where it is!

  • Dennis Cholmondley-Farqois says:

    For me, Steven Wells is the spiritual winner of DepicT! 2011. His Lego Film touches upon the darkest recesses of the psyche, exposing feelings of desolation and meta-hopelessnes never before explored by any film maker in history. I will never be the same after watching it.

  • WOWSER MAN says:

    Are the comments slagging this work off serious or friends having a joke? TREMENDOUS is to weak a word!

    Guy’s dont get bitter GET BETTER!

    HUGGLES x

  • yum_yum says:

    I didn’t understand it but i thought it was beautiful nonetheless. To AndiB – take your own advice and to the other haters take AndiB’s advice.

  • Rockus says:

    Steve wells, your comment is a subjective one, i find you may have a point. This film, is beautiful and crafted as if from an artistic brush. It depends what you want from film. I want narrative above anything, and for me this has little if any. It strikes me as a student class project that got top marks. I’m sure the filmmaker can now make a good narrative film. And it will look fantastic. Steve when leaving such a strong comment i was excited to see your work! However i lasted less than a minute.

  • catnip says:

    nice feminist piece, I found encouraging that it was selected

  • Epiq says:

    “Thomas Waddington says:
    15 Oct 2011 at 2:16 pm
    I think this short is brilliant. It does exactly what a short film should do- pose more questions than it answers.”

    Uh… what? So in your opinion short films should always leave the viewer more confused? I would hate to live in your world. The idea of a short film should be a story or an idea that isn’t big enough or long enough to make into a full length film, or vice versa. Posing questions, non-narrative art and all that other pretentious bull**** should be additional and unnecessary.

    Having said all that, I have no vested interest in this years competition entries but I still found this a little dull. Well shot, well directed (if unexciting) but boring. We all have an opinion, doesn’t mean that everyone else’s is wrong though.

  • Jo says:

    This is great! people who commented saying it has no content or no point are nuts.

Leave a Comment

Please read our Code of Conduct, in Watershed's Statement of Commitments before posting a comment.

More from 2011

Image for Wake

Wake
Nick Fogg

Image for Memory Loss

Memory Loss
Matthew Bartlett and James Kermack

Image for The Launderette

The Launderette
Tim Bassford