Watch Films > Archive > 2011

Our Satisfying Conclusion

by Henrik Dahle

   

19 Comments for “Our Satisfying Conclusion”

  • pppplaaaasttt says:

    bla,bla,bla,bla….self masturbation is very healthy keep on it

  • steve dexter says:

    I like this film.

  • steve dexter says:

    And please ignor pppplaaaasttt. He is just jelouse.

  • Jonathan Ley says:

    Good film. Strange though that year after year DepicT attracts sad, frustrated individuals who feel the need to leave mean-spirited comments on the shortlisted filmmakers’ work. Last year it was ‘billy’, this year ‘pppprrraaatttt’ (or whatever his name is). More than likely it’s the same lonely, unfulfilled person without the talent to make the shortlist themselves. It would be good if the moderators filtered out some of the more obviously trolling comments though.

  • pppplaaaasttt says:

    jajjajajajajajajjajajajajjajajajajajajaj

  • pppplaaaasttt says:

    yes man i’m jelous of pick up pictures from the web and stick one after another on final cut…i think must be a very hard work…

  • Henrik Dahle says:

    Hey… thanks for watching.
    Felt the need to respond to pppplaaaasstt.
    Made with final cut yes. Images are from all over the world, taken by many friends. Some images are from NASA, oldie woldie books, the Pentagon! and some other sources… all hand selected I might add.
    Many of them are personal to me and have a story of their own very separate from this film, and that’s part of the point.
    I should mention Max Tundra who made the electronic soundtrack from thousands of chopped up pieces of audio, and Lizzy Carey who composed and plays the strings. And where would this film be without David Bekkevold’s lovely accent and performance.

    I thought to call this film ‘Spot the Vagina’. Ha! But it makes light of the original idea.
    A pretty serious one.

    Or spot my retina. Or spot… something else.

  • Wibbles says:

    Or spot the dog… Or spot the point. I doubt we’ll find the latter though.

    Not jealous, just hoping for better.

  • josephine winther says:

    very clever and all encompassing somehow….I would have loved to see it slowed down so I could see obvious effort gone into story of chosen pics…strong sense of the long body of our lives and of universe

  • G. Gold says:

    Embryotic start exploding into a eye opening struggle to catch a moment. A slice of life at your birthday and a spoonful of medicine before death. Words reach out and provoke thought, yet the pictures fly by and give you a sense of our immortality while questioning our existence. I watched it twice the second time frame by frame. Was worth it. Well done.

  • G. Gold says:

    Reminded me of Jan Svankmajer’s ” ALICE”. A flickering surrealist contemplation.

  • RB says:

    Fascinating, engaging – beautifully controlled especially knowing when to relax and let the images flow.

    Great to see some work which leans more towards videoart on this shortlist.

    Very strong piece.

  • nigel says:

    Nice short Henrik. Hard for this kind of idea to avoid being pretentious, but I think you manage.

  • Bob says:

    i thought it was cool. good work.

  • Shan says:

    I like.

  • Jade says:

    Interesting … eye-boggling detail… Well done !

  • catnip & floss says:

    I think the selection this year is much better than last year, there is a real effort to present a variety of edgy and innovative films. Last year I didn’t understand why some films made it, this year I decided to enter the competition and was not selected but I don’t feel bitter like thecretin who is leaving negative comments on every films. At the contrary I feel motivated, every films shown here express with skills and style something deep. Thanks it was fun watching them all thanks!

  • […] and making a short drama is another but surely documentary is not possible in  90 seconds. Well Our Satisfying Conclusion is an example of a ninety second documentary that I think works really well. A technique used many […]

  • Matt says:

    The Sorrows of the Blind

    Pity the sorrows of the poor blind,
    For they can but little comfort find;
    As they walk along the street,
    They know not where to put their feet.
    They are deprived of that earthly joy
    Of seeing either man, woman, or boy;
    Sad and lonely through the world they go,
    Not knowing a friend from a foe:
    Nor the difference betwixt day and night,
    For the want of their eyesight;
    The blind mother cannot see her darling boy,
    That was once her soul’s joy.
    By day and night,
    Since she lost her precious sight;
    To her the world seems dark and drear,
    And she can find no comfort here.
    She once found pleasure in reading books,
    But now pale and careworn are her looks.
    Since she has lost her eyesight,
    Everything seems wrong and nothing right.

    The face of nature, with all its beauties and livery green,
    Appears to the blind just like a dream.
    All things beautiful have vanished from their sight,
    Which were once their heart’s delight.
    The blind father cannot see his beautiful child, nor wife,
    That was once the joy of his life;
    That he was wont to see at morn and night,
    When he had his eyesight.
    All comfort has vanished from him now,
    And a dejected look hangs on his brow.

    Kind Christians all, both great and small,
    Pity the sorrows of the blind,
    They can but little comfort find;
    Therefore we ought to be content with our lot,
    And for the eyesight we have got,
    And pray to God both day and night
    To preserve our eyesight;
    To be always willing to help the blind in their distress,
    And the Lord will surely bless
    And guard us by night and day,
    And remember us at the judgment day.
    William Topaz McGonagall

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